Make Boring Plans

Why isn’t this boring?

It might say something about the area that I focus on, Platform Engineering*, that “why isn’t this boring” would ever come up. You see, usually when people are in this situation, they blame everything but the lack of planning for their problems. It is a common belief in engineering that, with a clear enough vision, the rest of the pieces of work will fall into place. With a well-understood goal and smart engineers, the idea is that you can trust that people will work towards that vision faithfully and deliver something great. And this does, in rare cases, seem to work. After all, half of the hiring wisdom of the past has been “hire smart people and get out of their way.” Magic can happen with a small, highly-motivated group of people building a new thing towards a clear goal.

Novel Technology Deserves Boring Plans

Since we often end up in the land of novel technology, we owe it to ourselves and our customers to be boring in other ways. And the most important way that a Platform team can be boring is by writing boring plans.

A Strategic Plan Is Obvious and Simple, Even Boring

Making boring plans is a foundational step in getting good at setting engineering strategy. Strategy is often confused with innovation and vision in tech circles, but they are far from the same thing. Having a future vision and recognizing the potential of innovations is valuable in building great strategy, but strategies that rely on unproven magic bullets are not good strategies. Good strategy identifies a problem with the current situation, proposes a principled approach to overcome it, and then shows you a coherent roadmap to follow. Strategy is not in the business of razzle-dazzle, it’s in the business of getting to the core of the issues so that the solution becomes simple and obvious. Good strategy provides the clarity that enables boring plans.

  • How do we know when we’re in exploration mode, and how do we know when we’re ready to commit to a direction?
  • Have we talked to our users? Do we understand how they are using our systems, and have we made plans that account for their needs?
  • What are the problems we’re focused on solving right now, and which problems are we leaving to worry about another day?
  • How do we know if we’re on the wrong track, what are the guardrails, milestones, or metrics that tell us whether the plan needs review?

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store